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Agriculture: problems and pollution, new technologies and solutionsLe Potager du Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Agriculture and soil. Pollution control, soil remediation, humus and new agricultural techniques.
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Did67
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Did67 » 21/09/18, 16:22

I do not push for the "consumption" of the book - it sells very well like that. It is still, right now, the best selling side gardening books in the gardening and co section of amazon ... I would not have a hard time summarizing these 1 100 pages, but I had a hard time to make fit in the 300 pages of the book: the Potager du Sloth ("PP" for the intimate) is not a recipe. And even less a simple recipe.

For your main question: near your tree, and a fortiori below, you can do what you want, it will remain puny. The first fuel of life is light. The tree is not bad (even if your eyes deceive you, they "accommodate" and make you think it's clear). The second is CO² and water, the main materials from which life is built. CO² is not lacking, but under the tree, the mushrooms associated with the roots of the latter are much more powerful than your vegetables ...

So it's badly barred. And to that, no miraculous solution. In any case, for my part, I will not promise you any miracle. You can try Lourdes!
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Moindreffor » 21/09/18, 17:37

Did67 wrote:I do not push for the "consumption" of the book - it sells very well like that. It is still, right now, the best selling side gardening books in the gardening and co section of amazon ... I would not have a hard time summarizing these 1 100 pages, but I had a hard time to make fit in the 300 pages of the book: the Potager du Sloth ("PP" for the intimate) is not a recipe. And even less a simple recipe.

I do not push for the purchase of your book, it does not need it, but as this thread is a little cradle, you have the solution to read the whole thread, when I did it we were at 500 pages took me 3 months, small bits, it now has more than 1 100, it can be boring, while you made us a beautiful book, pleasant to read and very complete
I see it more as a tip to a friend, when you found a good thing, a good restaurant, a good beer, you want to share
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby to be chafoin » 21/09/18, 22:25

I did not know this problem of CO2..Il also I think a problem of acidification of the soil under the fir trees, pines, etc ... Try nearby strawberries, raspberries ...?
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Ahmed » 21/09/18, 22:58

This is not what Did means: light and CO² are the two main fuels of the living, but only the light is affected by the proximity of the conifer, for CO² it does not change anything since, as he says: "CO² is not lacking" ... Light is therefore an important limiting factor.
I note that for gardening on the edge of the Douglas fir, even the southern areas are infertile, probably because of the removal of water and mineral resources from the peripheral roots.
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby nico239 » 22/09/18, 01:58

cham65110 wrote:Hello and sorry to cut your conversation,
New on this forum, I try to learn a little more about this method but 1197 pages it will take me some time :P
I am very interested in the method and the principle. I have since 2 years now a garden in the Pyrenees, 800 m altitude.
I love spending time in my garden and harvesting my own vegetables, but unfortunately I do not have enough time to take care of it properly!
Last year was therefore my first test ... there were some difficulties and missed! This year was not better, invaded by slugs, all my seedlings were devoured! So I have a lot of work to do to save some crops ...
Of course I worked my garden by returning the land ... only my potatoes was on the ground and covered with grass clippings and a kind of BRF recovered at the waste dump green.
For next year, I would like to move to the method without turning the earth.
But I ask myself questions:
- My crops this year have had a hard time growing up: some have kept the same size since planting until today (eggplant, chilli among others). Do you know what it can be like?
-I intended to smoke my garden. Is this possible and useful if I finally put hay? and how can I proceed? (I want to clarify that my garden is located partly under a tree ... and on a plot or a kitchen garden was already present a few years before we buy the home: the land is it impoverished?) .
In short, full of questions that will come as and when, but I hope to embark on a culture without turning the earth;)
Thank you


The best would be to make a beautiful picture of this vegetable garden so that we better understand your situation ...
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Moindreffor » 22/09/18, 08:47

Ahmed wrote:This is not what Did means: light and CO² are the two main fuels of the living, but only the light is affected by the proximity of the conifer, for CO² it does not change anything since, as he says: "CO² is not lacking" ... Light is therefore an important limiting factor.
I note that for gardening on the edge of the Douglas fir, even the southern areas are infertile, probably because of the removal of water and mineral resources from the peripheral roots.

along a cedar hedge it's the same or worse nothing grows, and along my box, I put a core of cabbage last year it is still intact after more than a year spent under the hay, the soil is dry from home dry and the hay is intact too
so in my opinion the trees take all the water
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby to be chafoin » 22/09/18, 11:34

This is apparently the problem of the pine forest of the Landes: the soil is ultra dry, because of the powerful roots of trees.
With the acidity of the soil, most of the plants that grow there are Ericaceae: arbutus, heather. There are also rhizomatic plants such as ferns.
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Moindreffor » 22/09/18, 11:53

to be chafoin wrote:This is apparently the problem of the pine forest of the Landes: the soil is ultra dry, because of the powerful roots of trees.
With the acidity of the soil, most of the plants that grow there are Ericaceae: arbutus, heather. There are also rhizomatic plants such as ferns.

we planted pine trees to dry the marshes and it worked
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby to be chafoin » 22/09/18, 12:21

ChristianC wrote:We made the potatoes harvest; 15 m2, 45 kg.
a / - On the "good hay" plot, planted on 10 m2 with about 75 plants, the quantity is 33,5 kg, ie 3,3 kg at m2 and 440 grams at plant.
b / - On the "dry hay" plot, planted on 5 m2 with 30 plants, 12 kg was obtained, ie 2,4 kg at m2 and 330 grams per plant.
The yield is low, but the effort was even more!
But I wish we could make comparisons on our site. As Didier says, we want to pick up more! So ? Your stats and observations friends? What improvements to make?
It is at the end of the fair that we count the dung.
Last harvest of pdt and small approximate calculations, not to know who has the biggest but to know if the soil / the method is good / at least to get a vague idea even.

A little more than 40kg for a little less than 110 feet, an average of just under 400g / foot.

Looking quickly at the yields posted on the internet, if we are far from Charles Dowding of course, we are also far from the returns traditionally announced ("1kg per foot") or raised for example here: http://www.potager-et-jardin.fr/rendement-pomme-de-terre/. What to think? My soil is too poor, or serious lack of growth due to lack of water ...?

Some distinctions and personal remarks:
: Arrow: The cultivation on mown grass and under hay gave a much less good yield on average (to 250g / foot) but I found the crop really nice (while to harvest the pdt under dry clay ... !! : Evil: )
: Arrow: Cultivation of the buried peat, butt and then mulched late yielded a slightly less good on average (to 380 g / foot)
: Arrow: The cultivation of the pdt slightly buried then covered with a thick layer of hay gave the best yield
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby to be chafoin » 22/09/18, 12:22

Moindreffor wrote:we planted pine trees to dry the marshes and it worked
yes, but large-scale monoculture has also screwed up
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